SafeMotherhood
safe motherhood

LOOKING AFTER YOURSELF

MEDICINES/VACCINATIONS

COMPLEMENTARY THERAPIES
ALCOHOL, SMOKING, CAFFEINE AND CANNABIS
MEDICINES/VACCINATIONS
EXERCISING SAFELY
EATING SAFELY
ESSENTIAL VITAMINS AND MINERALS
WHAT TO EAT IN PREGNANCY
Giving up smoking
Safe exercises
Chickenpox (varicella)
TRAVEL
Back to Introduction

Vaccinations

No vaccination should be given lightly. This is particularly true in pregnancy. Protective immunoglobulins, for example, tetanus, rabies and hepatitis A, are considered safe, but vaccines against, for example, polio, diptheria and meningitis, should only be given if there is no alternative.

Taking care with drugs

'Drugs' means anything you take to prevent or relieve symptoms - whether it is swallowed, injected, massaged onto the skin, breathed in, or applied in any other way to your body. This includes complementary remedies and treatments,as well as conventional medications.

Many women need to take drugs to control or treat a long-term illness or medical condition. If possible, discuss your medication with your GP or specialist before you get pregnant. If this has not been possible, contact your doctor as soon as you suspect you are pregnant. Together you can balance the benefits and risks of your drugs and, if necessary, find safer alternatives.

Always tell anybody treating you that you are pregnant, even if you think it is obvious.

Always ask your GP or a pharmacist for advice before buying or taking any over-the-counter drugs - even things like cold remedies or headache tablets.

Remember that your baby is being formed during the first 12 weeks of your pregnancy. Try to avoid taking any drugs during this crucial time. The rapid development of your baby, combined with its very small size, will make it vulnerable to all types of medication.